Driving & Charging

How do you charge your electric car at home when electricity is cheapest?

You can save money on gas by driving an electric car. And you'll save even more by charging when electricity is cheapest.

How do you charge your electric car at home when electricity is cheapest?

Depending on where you live, you can manage the time of day or night when you charge your electric car to save money on electricity.

What can affect your cost to charge at home?

If you’ve never read your electric bill carefully, we don’t blame you.  But if you have, you may have noticed that it’s more complicated than a single price for each unit of electricity.  

In many places, electric utilities are now charging more for electricity at some times of day than at others.  This is usually called “Time of Day” or “Time of Use” pricing..  

This might seem complicated, but it has a huge hidden benefit for savvy electric car drivers. Here’s how a discerning electric car driver can benefit. 

Often the lowest cost electricity rates are overnight (and sometimes during the morning or midday).  If you have a home EV charger, those hours can be an ideal time to charge your car to be ready for your morning commute.  Let’s see how much you can benefit by looking at that example from Georgia again:


To find out if you can benefit in this way, there’s two things you’ll want to do:

  1. Check to see if your electric utility has a Time of Day rate or a rate that’s specially made for electric car drivers (which may be similarly structured).

  2. Set your EV charger and your car to automatically charge your car during the hours when electricity is cheapest.  (You should still be able to fully recharge overnight).

How much would it save you?  If the Mustang Mach-E driver above drives 15,000 miles per year, their entire fuel cost will be $225.  That’s how much someone could easily spend on gas in just one month!     


Link’s EV Pro Membership helps you get set up to save, and then watch the savings roll in every month. Your EV Expert will get you set up with the right rate after you purchase your electric car through Link.

How do you charge your electric car at home when electricity is cheapest?

Depending on where you live, you can manage the time of day or night when you charge your electric car to save money on electricity.

What can affect your cost to charge at home?

If you’ve never read your electric bill carefully, we don’t blame you.  But if you have, you may have noticed that it’s more complicated than a single price for each unit of electricity.  

In many places, electric utilities are now charging more for electricity at some times of day than at others.  This is usually called “Time of Day” or “Time of Use” pricing..  

This might seem complicated, but it has a huge hidden benefit for savvy electric car drivers. Here’s how a discerning electric car driver can benefit. 

Often the lowest cost electricity rates are overnight (and sometimes during the morning or midday).  If you have a home EV charger, those hours can be an ideal time to charge your car to be ready for your morning commute.  Let’s see how much you can benefit by looking at that example from Georgia again:


To find out if you can benefit in this way, there’s two things you’ll want to do:

  1. Check to see if your electric utility has a Time of Day rate or a rate that’s specially made for electric car drivers (which may be similarly structured).

  2. Set your EV charger and your car to automatically charge your car during the hours when electricity is cheapest.  (You should still be able to fully recharge overnight).

How much would it save you?  If the Mustang Mach-E driver above drives 15,000 miles per year, their entire fuel cost will be $225.  That’s how much someone could easily spend on gas in just one month!     


Link’s EV Pro Membership helps you get set up to save, and then watch the savings roll in every month. Your EV Expert will get you set up with the right rate after you purchase your electric car through Link.

Take the first step to your electric driving future

EV Buyer's Guide