Driving & Charging

How much does it cost to charge an electric car at home?

One of the appeals of driving electric is saving money on gas. We break down how much you can expect to pay when you’re plugging your car in at home instead of filling up on gas.

How much does it cost to charge an electric car at home?

Saving money on gas is a huge benefit of driving electric. But exactly how much can you save?

The good news about charging an electric car is that it is almost certainly going to be cheaper than gas for the equivalent miles you’ll drive.  If you’re like many Americans and you drive 15,000 or more miles per year, you could save $1,000 or more every year that you drive electric. 

The other great news is that electricity prices don’t vary as much as gas prices.  You can be much more certain that if you pay $10 to charge your battery this winter, you’ll pay roughly the same next summer and even next year.  

3 Things to Keep in Mind to Save on Home Charging


Just like filling a gas tank, the cost to charge an electric car varies based on what car you drive, where you live and where you charge.  Usually it is in the range of $5-15 if you charge at home, and $10-30 at a public charger stations.  Here are Link’s key recommendations for how to think about it:

  1. Charging your EV overnight at home is usually cheapest - just a few dollars per full battery.

  2. Public charger stations are more expensive, but you can save if you’re smart and plan ahead.

  3. Getting the right home energy plan or solar panels can get you the greatest savings.

Below you can see exactly how much it will cost in each of these charging methods.

How much will it cost for your car at your home?

When you charge your car at home, your electric utility takes the place of your gas station.  Instead of gallons, you’ll be thinking in kilowatt-hours or “kWh”. (A kilowatt-hour is just a unit of electricity). Just like gas prices, electricity prices vary by state.  Just like a gas tank, a battery has a capacity in terms of kilowatt-hours.  For example, a Kia Niro EV has a 64 kWh battery.

Electricity prices range a lot.  For example, average prices are as as low as $0.08 per kWh unit in places like the South and Pacific Northwest, to over $0.20 per kWh unit in California and the Northeast. You can check your utility bill to see your electricity price, or look at average prices compiled by the government here. To find out how much it’ll cost to charge an electric car, just multiply the battery capacity by the electricity cost.

Comparing costs across models and electric rates

Here’s an example of how much it costs to fill two popular EVs with different battery sizes, the Chevy Bolt and the Tesla Model Y:  



Filling your “tank” for about ten bucks sounds great, doesn’t it?  

Estimating what your car charging cost will be

It’s easy to estimate what charging an electric car will cost.  You’ll need two things:

  1. An estimate of how large a battery your electric car will have.  

    If you’re still deciding which electric car you want, a lot of smaller electric cars have batteries with about 70 kWh capacity.  A large electric car like the F-150 or Rivian might have up to 130 kWh.

  2. Your electric bill to see your electricity rates. 

    Your electric bill may be hard to decipher, but it should summarize for you somewhere what the average cost is per kilowatt hour.  Sometimes the cost varies based on the time of day (more on that here), so you can choose the cost that corresponds to when you’ll charge - usually overnight.

When you have these two things, just multiply the average cost per kilowatt-hour and the size of your battery, and that’ll be the cost to charge!

Remember that you won’t pay that much every day - you’ll only pay for what you recharge.

How much can you save?

If the Chevy Bolt driver in New York drives 15,000 miles per year, they’ll pay just $570 for fuel the entire year.  Compare that to paying for gas at $3.50 a gallon, and they’d likely save over $1,000 a year depending on the mileage of their previous car.  

To figure out how much you can save, figure out how many many full battery charges you’d do with an electric car.  For example, if you drive 15,000 miles per year and you get a VW ID.4 with 250 miles of range, you’d charge the equivalent of 60 full battery charges.  If you figure out what a full battery charge will cost, you can figure out how much less that’ll be than what you pay for gas today.

Depending on your electric utility, you may be able to charge your car at home for even less. 
Want to get help figuring out what your specific cost to charge an electric car will be? That’s what an EV Expert is here for! Set up a consultation today to answer any of your electric driving questions.

How much does it cost to charge an electric car at home?

Saving money on gas is a huge benefit of driving electric. But exactly how much can you save?

The good news about charging an electric car is that it is almost certainly going to be cheaper than gas for the equivalent miles you’ll drive.  If you’re like many Americans and you drive 15,000 or more miles per year, you could save $1,000 or more every year that you drive electric. 

The other great news is that electricity prices don’t vary as much as gas prices.  You can be much more certain that if you pay $10 to charge your battery this winter, you’ll pay roughly the same next summer and even next year.  

3 Things to Keep in Mind to Save on Home Charging


Just like filling a gas tank, the cost to charge an electric car varies based on what car you drive, where you live and where you charge.  Usually it is in the range of $5-15 if you charge at home, and $10-30 at a public charger stations.  Here are Link’s key recommendations for how to think about it:

  1. Charging your EV overnight at home is usually cheapest - just a few dollars per full battery.

  2. Public charger stations are more expensive, but you can save if you’re smart and plan ahead.

  3. Getting the right home energy plan or solar panels can get you the greatest savings.

Below you can see exactly how much it will cost in each of these charging methods.

How much will it cost for your car at your home?

When you charge your car at home, your electric utility takes the place of your gas station.  Instead of gallons, you’ll be thinking in kilowatt-hours or “kWh”. (A kilowatt-hour is just a unit of electricity). Just like gas prices, electricity prices vary by state.  Just like a gas tank, a battery has a capacity in terms of kilowatt-hours.  For example, a Kia Niro EV has a 64 kWh battery.

Electricity prices range a lot.  For example, average prices are as as low as $0.08 per kWh unit in places like the South and Pacific Northwest, to over $0.20 per kWh unit in California and the Northeast. You can check your utility bill to see your electricity price, or look at average prices compiled by the government here. To find out how much it’ll cost to charge an electric car, just multiply the battery capacity by the electricity cost.

Comparing costs across models and electric rates

Here’s an example of how much it costs to fill two popular EVs with different battery sizes, the Chevy Bolt and the Tesla Model Y:  



Filling your “tank” for about ten bucks sounds great, doesn’t it?  

Estimating what your car charging cost will be

It’s easy to estimate what charging an electric car will cost.  You’ll need two things:

  1. An estimate of how large a battery your electric car will have.  

    If you’re still deciding which electric car you want, a lot of smaller electric cars have batteries with about 70 kWh capacity.  A large electric car like the F-150 or Rivian might have up to 130 kWh.

  2. Your electric bill to see your electricity rates. 

    Your electric bill may be hard to decipher, but it should summarize for you somewhere what the average cost is per kilowatt hour.  Sometimes the cost varies based on the time of day (more on that here), so you can choose the cost that corresponds to when you’ll charge - usually overnight.

When you have these two things, just multiply the average cost per kilowatt-hour and the size of your battery, and that’ll be the cost to charge!

Remember that you won’t pay that much every day - you’ll only pay for what you recharge.

How much can you save?

If the Chevy Bolt driver in New York drives 15,000 miles per year, they’ll pay just $570 for fuel the entire year.  Compare that to paying for gas at $3.50 a gallon, and they’d likely save over $1,000 a year depending on the mileage of their previous car.  

To figure out how much you can save, figure out how many many full battery charges you’d do with an electric car.  For example, if you drive 15,000 miles per year and you get a VW ID.4 with 250 miles of range, you’d charge the equivalent of 60 full battery charges.  If you figure out what a full battery charge will cost, you can figure out how much less that’ll be than what you pay for gas today.

Depending on your electric utility, you may be able to charge your car at home for even less. 
Want to get help figuring out what your specific cost to charge an electric car will be? That’s what an EV Expert is here for! Set up a consultation today to answer any of your electric driving questions.

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