Driving & Charging

Is it worth paying more for an electric car that can charge super fast?

Some electric cars are able to charge faster than others. Your lifestyle can determine what charging capability is most suitable for you.

Is it worth paying more for an electric car that can charge super fast?

Automakers know that people are concerned about how long it will take to recharge an electric car if they’re on a trip, so they’re touting the impressive speeds at which today’s EV’s can recharge.  You may see numbers thrown around like “Tesla Model 3 can charge 175 miles in 15 minutes” or “Hyundai’s Ioniq5 can charge 10% to 80% in just 18 minutes.”  

What does this really mean for which electric car you should buy? Is it worth paying for an extra fast charge speed?  An Ioniq5 could cost $10,000 more than a Chevy Bolt with similar range.  There’s a few things to keep in mind.  

First, when you charge your car at home overnight, here’s how long it takes: 5 seconds. That’s how long it takes to plug it in and walk away.  If you have a home EV charger, you may hardly ever need to stop at a public charging station.

But is it worth paying more for a car that charges up super fast on road trips or if you don’t have a home charger?

Fast Charging Cars Need Fast Chargers. But They’re Coming (Fast).

First, to get the fastest charge possible, you’ll need both a fast charging car and a fast charging charger.  Soon you’ll be able to buy a Hyundai Ioniq5 that can charge at a super fast 350kW.  If you look on a map of chargers, you may only see ones around you that can go up to 100kW.  This is like if your computer is faster than your internet connection - you’ll be limited by the connection.

The good news is, more and more fast chargers up to 350 kW are being installed. So if you invest in a Hyundai Ioniq5, that fast charging capability will get more and more useful over time.  You’ll just have to wait for the situation to mature.

How Fast is Fast, Really?

Speed to charge an EV is a tricky question - there is no single answer, because charging speed changes as the battery fills up (and also based on whether the charger can get all the electricity it needs at that moment, how hot the battery is, and more).  

Remember calculus from school?  There’s some of that involved here, but we won’t make you do it.  Here’s a quick summary:

The faster a car can charge, the more it will adjust its charge rate as the battery fills, because it is very intensive on both the charger and the battery to run at that max level for very long.

And here’s a little secret: many EV’s rarely get to their max rated charge speed, even if they’re at a charger that can handle that.  If they do, they only get there for a few short minutes.

When the battery gets to around 80% filled, charging tends to slow down dramatically.  This is for the good of your battery in the long run.

What does this mean in practice?  

Here’s a simplified estimate of how two popular electric cars, the Chevy Bolt and Volkswagen ID.4 stack up next to Hyundai’s Ioniq5, coming soon:


What does this mean?

If you’re adding 100 miles to a Chevy Bolt, that’ll only take you 20 minutes more than a Hyundai Ioniq5, despite its much-touted hyper fast charge speed.

However, if you’re adding a full 200 miles, that’ll add almost an hour versus the Ioniq5.  

Choosing the right EV all comes down to how you use your electric car.  If you’re doing almost all your driving in town and can charge a Chevy Bolt at home, you’ll hardly ever need to do that 75 minute recharge at a fast charger.  You might regret paying for fast charging capability that only saves you an hour once a year. And you won’t want to wait until mid-2022 or later to get your hands on an Ioniq5.

But if you’re zooming up and down the interstate every weekend, you’ll love how fast you can recharge in an Ioniq5, and the added price tag for fast charging (and other great features) could well be worth it.  

Ready to sort out which EV is the right one for you, for your driving? Schedule an EV Expert Consultation today and hone in on the right car for you.

Is it worth paying more for an electric car that can charge super fast?

Automakers know that people are concerned about how long it will take to recharge an electric car if they’re on a trip, so they’re touting the impressive speeds at which today’s EV’s can recharge.  You may see numbers thrown around like “Tesla Model 3 can charge 175 miles in 15 minutes” or “Hyundai’s Ioniq5 can charge 10% to 80% in just 18 minutes.”  

What does this really mean for which electric car you should buy? Is it worth paying for an extra fast charge speed?  An Ioniq5 could cost $10,000 more than a Chevy Bolt with similar range.  There’s a few things to keep in mind.  

First, when you charge your car at home overnight, here’s how long it takes: 5 seconds. That’s how long it takes to plug it in and walk away.  If you have a home EV charger, you may hardly ever need to stop at a public charging station.

But is it worth paying more for a car that charges up super fast on road trips or if you don’t have a home charger?

Fast Charging Cars Need Fast Chargers. But They’re Coming (Fast).

First, to get the fastest charge possible, you’ll need both a fast charging car and a fast charging charger.  Soon you’ll be able to buy a Hyundai Ioniq5 that can charge at a super fast 350kW.  If you look on a map of chargers, you may only see ones around you that can go up to 100kW.  This is like if your computer is faster than your internet connection - you’ll be limited by the connection.

The good news is, more and more fast chargers up to 350 kW are being installed. So if you invest in a Hyundai Ioniq5, that fast charging capability will get more and more useful over time.  You’ll just have to wait for the situation to mature.

How Fast is Fast, Really?

Speed to charge an EV is a tricky question - there is no single answer, because charging speed changes as the battery fills up (and also based on whether the charger can get all the electricity it needs at that moment, how hot the battery is, and more).  

Remember calculus from school?  There’s some of that involved here, but we won’t make you do it.  Here’s a quick summary:

The faster a car can charge, the more it will adjust its charge rate as the battery fills, because it is very intensive on both the charger and the battery to run at that max level for very long.

And here’s a little secret: many EV’s rarely get to their max rated charge speed, even if they’re at a charger that can handle that.  If they do, they only get there for a few short minutes.

When the battery gets to around 80% filled, charging tends to slow down dramatically.  This is for the good of your battery in the long run.

What does this mean in practice?  

Here’s a simplified estimate of how two popular electric cars, the Chevy Bolt and Volkswagen ID.4 stack up next to Hyundai’s Ioniq5, coming soon:


What does this mean?

If you’re adding 100 miles to a Chevy Bolt, that’ll only take you 20 minutes more than a Hyundai Ioniq5, despite its much-touted hyper fast charge speed.

However, if you’re adding a full 200 miles, that’ll add almost an hour versus the Ioniq5.  

Choosing the right EV all comes down to how you use your electric car.  If you’re doing almost all your driving in town and can charge a Chevy Bolt at home, you’ll hardly ever need to do that 75 minute recharge at a fast charger.  You might regret paying for fast charging capability that only saves you an hour once a year. And you won’t want to wait until mid-2022 or later to get your hands on an Ioniq5.

But if you’re zooming up and down the interstate every weekend, you’ll love how fast you can recharge in an Ioniq5, and the added price tag for fast charging (and other great features) could well be worth it.  

Ready to sort out which EV is the right one for you, for your driving? Schedule an EV Expert Consultation today and hone in on the right car for you.

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